Julie D. Cantor, M.D., J.D.

You've seen the headlines: A woman is arrested after giving birth because a drug screening test was positive.  A court orders a pregnant woman to submit to any and all medical treatment her obstetrician deems necessary.  A new abortion law raises questions about the longevity of Roe v. Wade.  Thoughtful people with expertise in both medicine and law need to unpack these kinds of issues, with both clinicians and the public.

Julie Cantor, MD | JD — Dr. Cantor does just that. A faculty member at the UCLA School of Law, creative thinker, and graduate of Stanford University, UC Berkeley School of Law, and the Yale University School of Medicine, Dr. Cantor offers unique perspectives on issues at the intersection of law, medicine, and medical ethics.  Drawing on academic articles, case law, history, and art, her lectures are engaging multi-media presentations that navigate cutting-edge dilemmas, leaving audiences with a deeper understanding of complex issues and a firmer grasp on potential solutions. And she is often called upon by the national and international media to comment on problems that arise where law and medicine meet.

Dr. Cantor is also the founder + CEO of Harlen, a brand that elevates luxury work bags for women to Modern Careerpieces — works of art for the art of work. Both the Collection and its materials are handcrafted in Italy in the storied ateliers that have perfected this craft over generations. Harlen was inspired by those who lead lives of significance with style, and every piece moves opportunity forward for women and girls worldwide.


ON AIR + IN PRINT

Room for Debate: Doctors in the Death Chamber

Room for Debate: Doctors in the Death Chamber

Access to Abortion in the USA—The Legal Battle

Access to Abortion in the USA—The Legal Battle

Beyond  Roe v. Wade : Here’s What Gorsuch Means for Abortion

Beyond Roe v. Wade: Here’s What Gorsuch Means for Abortion

Jackson Trial: When Does Malpractice Become Criminal?

Jackson Trial: When Does Malpractice Become Criminal?

The Modern Midwifery Movement

The Modern Midwifery Movement

A Doctors Cater to Looks, Skin Patients Wait

A Doctors Cater to Looks, Skin Patients Wait

Doctor Gets Life in Prison For Outbreak

Doctor Gets Life in Prison For Outbreak

Separate and Unequal: Challenging the Criminalization of Pregnancy Behavior

Separate and Unequal: Challenging the Criminalization of Pregnancy Behavior

 
 

CURRENT LECTURES

Corresponding with an article she published in the  New England Journal of Medicine , Dr. Cantor considers whether doctors' orders should ever become court orders and discusses whether there should be any exceptions to informed consent and informed refusal that apply during pregnancy. Includes compelling video footage of a patient who was forced to undergo a C-section in a Florida hospital, explicitly without her consent.

Corresponding with an article she published in the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Cantor considers whether doctors' orders should ever become court orders and discusses whether there should be any exceptions to informed consent and informed refusal that apply during pregnancy. Includes compelling video footage of a patient who was forced to undergo a C-section in a Florida hospital, explicitly without her consent.

Why do American courts continue to consider abortion cases? Why haven't issues related to abortion been resolved? In this lecture, Dr. Cantor walks participants through the history of abortion in the United States. She traces the current case law from the Supreme Court of the United States and offers thoughts on what the appointment of the most recent Justice might mean for the future.

Why do American courts continue to consider abortion cases? Why haven't issues related to abortion been resolved? In this lecture, Dr. Cantor walks participants through the history of abortion in the United States. She traces the current case law from the Supreme Court of the United States and offers thoughts on what the appointment of the most recent Justice might mean for the future.

As a general matter, parents are the people who make healthcare decisions for their children. But parents and pediatricians are not always on the same page. That conflict may be brought into stark relief at the birth of a so-called "micro preemie" baby. The NICU team may want to continue aggressive measures while the parents want to withdraw care. What are the issues, and who decides? This lecture includes video from the Michigan case of the dermatologist who removed life support from his newborn son, delivered at 23 weeks gestation, and was subsequently arrested and tried—to a jury verdict—for his actions.

As a general matter, parents are the people who make healthcare decisions for their children. But parents and pediatricians are not always on the same page. That conflict may be brought into stark relief at the birth of a so-called "micro preemie" baby. The NICU team may want to continue aggressive measures while the parents want to withdraw care. What are the issues, and who decides? This lecture includes video from the Michigan case of the dermatologist who removed life support from his newborn son, delivered at 23 weeks gestation, and was subsequently arrested and tried—to a jury verdict—for his actions.

In 1976, the California Supreme Court weighed in on the duty of psychiatrists and other providers of mental health care to breach confidentiality and warn an intended victim and the police of specific and foreseeable harm. While health care providers were required to report, they were not expected to have a crystal ball. However, in  Volk v. DeMeerleer , the Supreme Court of Washington State recently took a more onerous approach to predicting a patient's potential for violence, seemingly expanding the rule of  Tarasoff  beyond recognition. Dr. Cantor explains the change and predicts what the future may hold for the duty of confidentiality.

In 1976, the California Supreme Court weighed in on the duty of psychiatrists and other providers of mental health care to breach confidentiality and warn an intended victim and the police of specific and foreseeable harm. While health care providers were required to report, they were not expected to have a crystal ball. However, in Volk v. DeMeerleer, the Supreme Court of Washington State recently took a more onerous approach to predicting a patient's potential for violence, seemingly expanding the rule of Tarasoff beyond recognition. Dr. Cantor explains the change and predicts what the future may hold for the duty of confidentiality.

 
The Trump Administration's Department of Health and Human Services recently promulgated so-called "conscientious objection" rules for healthcare professionals. Concerned that good workers would be discouraged from pursuing careers in medicine, the new rule is a bit of déjà vu from the George W. Bush administration and it purports to protect the belief system of those whose consciences will not allow them to participate in certain aspects of a patient's care. Do we need rules like this? What do they say about our pluralistic society?

The Trump Administration's Department of Health and Human Services recently promulgated so-called "conscientious objection" rules for healthcare professionals. Concerned that good workers would be discouraged from pursuing careers in medicine, the new rule is a bit of déjà vu from the George W. Bush administration and it purports to protect the belief system of those whose consciences will not allow them to participate in certain aspects of a patient's care. Do we need rules like this? What do they say about our pluralistic society?

 
 
 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Conscientious Objection Gone Awry—Restoring Selfless Professionalism in Medicine

Conscientious Objection Gone Awry—Restoring Selfless Professionalism in Medicine

Privacy Protections for Cybercharts: An Update on the Law

Privacy Protections for Cybercharts: An Update on the Law

Bracing for the Impact of Expanded Second Amendment Rights

Bracing for the Impact of Expanded Second Amendment Rights

When Contraceptives Clash with Conscience, Whose Rights Prevail?

When Contraceptives Clash with Conscience, Whose Rights Prevail?

Court-Ordered Care—A Complication of Pregnancy to Avoid

Court-Ordered Care—A Complication of Pregnancy to Avoid

Of Pills and Needles: Involuntarily Medicating the Psychotic Inmate when Execution Looms

Of Pills and Needles: Involuntarily Medicating the Psychotic Inmate when Execution Looms


SELECTED PRIOR ENGAGEMENTS